All Things Chromatography

Opportunities in Africa

Recently, we had a chance to attend a conference sponsored by U.S. Senator Chris Coons featuring some of the top names in international leadership discussing the future of Africa.

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  • Millennium Challenge Corporation Chief Executive Officer Daniel Yohannes
  • U.S. Agency for International Development Director Dr. Raj Shah
  • His Excellency Cyrille S. Oguin, Ambassador of Benin
  • Rebecca Faber, World Trade Center Delaware
  • Tim McCoy, Vice President, Corporate Council on Africa
  • John Kilama, Ph.D., Founder, Global Bioscience Diversity Institute
  • Mike Haney, Business Development, Wise Power
  • Stephen K. Morrison, Foreign Commercial Service Officer, U.S. Export Assistance Center, U.S. Department of Commerce
  • James Kiiru, Economic Attache, Kenyan Embassy 
  • Thomas DeBass, Dir., Global Partnership Initiative, Office of the Secretary of State
  • Romi Bhatia, U.S. Agency for International Development
  • Mark Quarterman, Research Director, the Enough Project
  • Leslie Lefkow, Senior Researcher on Africa, Human Rights Watch
  • Dahlia Rockowitz, Director of Reverse Hunger Campaign, American Jewish World Service
  • Faustine Wabwire, Foreign Assistance Policy Analyst, Bread for the World Institute
  • Blake Selzer, Senior Policy Advisor, CARE
  • Dr. Pearl Alice Marsh, U.S. Policy Director, ONE Campaign
  • Donna Barry, Advocacy and Policy Director, Partners in Health

A consistent theme emerged from this conference - innovation, research, and science will play major roles in both accelerating the economic opportunities in Africa and addressing humanitarian issues.

We were proud to participate in this event and look forward to working with our friends in the global scientific community to make our world a better place for all of us.

 

Topics: Africa, science, research

Latest Technology for Training in the Medical Field

UPDATE: New Video just released on this program:

Our company is fortunate to be involved with the DelawareVirtual hospital BioScience Association BioScience Association and the Technology Forum of Delaware - both organizations have held events at Christiana Care where we have been able to tour a newly opened virtual training hospital.

This training area is designed to mimic everything from an Emergency Room to an Operating Room to a Delivery Room where entire medical teams are put in situations and practice techniques and procedures on the very life-like "patients" (some of them have pulses, talk, and even change skin color if they are not getting enough oxygen).

Here's a look at the hospital from the WHYY TV Program "First"

Watch the full episode. See more First.

Topics: teachers, science, test, Medical Training

Alan Alda teaches scientists how to communicate better

Our friends at TheScientist.com recently published an Alan Aldainteresting story about the efforts of Alan Alda to teach scientists how to communicate their research and discoveries to the world.

Here's some excerpts:

"We need to talk to the public," Alda says. "This is holding back the country, and it's holding back the world from making progress on what we now know." He encountered this failure to relate ideas repeatedly when he interviewed hundreds of the world's top scientists about their discoveries for Scientific American Frontiers, a show that ran on public television from 1993-2005.

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For Alda the problem starts at the most basic level of communication. "The affect, facial expression body language -- these are things that you wouldn't think are part of a scientific presentation," he says. "Emotion is so important. In scientific communication emotion is probably trained out of us, but there's no reason why it can't be included. Science is a great detective story, especially when you're talking to the public. You want them to get involved in this interesting, emotional tangle."

You can read the complete article here.

Here's a look at the program Mr. Alda is running at The Center for Communicating Science:

Topics: teachers, science, Alan Alda

Social Networking in the Scientific Community

The latest issue of The Peak from LCGC North America LCGC Coverfeatures a great Cover Story on Social Networking in the Scientific Community.

Here's a couple of excerpts:

The BIO organization, who hosts the annual BIO Conference, has a presence on several social media sites, including LinkedIn which has more than 6000 members, Flickr, Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. They also deliver news during the convention using these vehicles and make use of blogs to engage in two way conversations with their members.

LCGC articlePittcon began building its online community recently with a presence on LinkedIn and Twitter, and among its 300 followers on Twitter include scientists, exhibitors and scientific publishers. Pittcon also is planning on launching its own online scientific community later in 2009.

“A few years ago, we introduced live networking sessions where conferees and exhibitors could brainstorm ideas and discuss solutions to scientific problems in an informal environment,” said Annette Wilson, Pittcon 2010 President. “We think scientists will benefit from engaging in these discussions year round and we will provide the collaborative environment where they can do so easily.”

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Mary Canady added: “When I arrived at the BIO meeting, I felt like I already had many friends there because I had developed relationships through my online networks prior to the meeting.”

Click Here to read the full article.

Topics: Pittcon, LCGC, Social Media, science, BIO